Intra-uterine growth retardation in relation to NVP or HG

29.   INTRA-UTERINE GROWTH RETARDATION IN RELATION TO NVP OR HG

 

1.   The foetuses of gravidas admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum are not at increased risk for growth retardation. 193 patients with hyper emesis gravidarum. 13,053 pregnant women in the study population. (61)

2.   There was no significant difference in the incidence of intra-uterine growth retardation between women with hyperemesis gravidarum (164) and the control group (209). (64)

3.   Women with hyperemesis gravidarum causing loss of greater than 5% of their pre-pregnancy weight, Group A (n=30), we compared to women with symptoms of nausea and vomiting but maintaining at least 95% of their pre-pregnancy body weight. Group B (n=34). Baby’s growth retardation occurred in Group A. (42)

4.   A modest association between severe vomiting and small for gestational age infants was identified in the present study. 201 women with severe vomiting, compared to 1,666 women with no vomiting. (65)

5.   18% of infants in the multiple admissions group were small for gestational age as compared to 7% in the single admissions group. This difference approached but did not achieve statistical significance. (33) A small for gestational age infant was diagnosed on the basis of weight

6.   No significant association (P

7.   Compared to women without hyperemesis n=127,835 infants born to women with hyperemesis and with low pregnancy weight gain n=144 are more likely to be low for gestational age. (158)

Summary

 A.   Severe hyperemesis gravidarum association with intra-uterine growth retardation.

Total 235 women with hyperemesis. (33) (42) (65) (158)

Total:   Four References

 

B.   Hyperemesis gravidarum not associated with intra-uterine growth retardation.

Total 359 women with hyper emesis. (61) (64)  

Total:   Two References

 

C.   No association between freedom from nausea and intra-uterine growth retardation.   

2,253 pregnancies no nausea. (51) t      

Total:   One Reference

 

t P Value Recorded

 

Severe hyperemesis defined as loss of greater than 5% of pre-pregnancy weight or multiple admissions to hospital for HG.

 

Did you know?

Early access to treatments is likely to be more effective and may prevent symptoms developing into HG

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